Transforming War Economies

Handbook Dialogue No. 3

War economies are recognized as a force to be reckoned with in transforming violent ethnopolitical conflict. Analysts discern, for example, civil wars relying heavily on various means of war-related income: the skimming of valuable assets and resources in the country in question, the wheeling and dealing of black markets and informal economies, legal and illegal trading networks across borders. Economics can no longer be seen as a separate, apolitical sphere. Handbook Dialogue 3 therefore looks at strategies, dilemmas and options in addressing war-related economies, shedding light on the issue from various angles and highlighting especially controversies and creative solutions.


  • Martina Fischer & Beatrix Schmelzle (Eds.): Transforming War Economies. Dilemmas and Strategies. 2005. Handbook Dialogue Series No. 3 - complete. Hardcopy >


Single contributions

  • Martina Fischer & Beatrix Schmelzle: Introduction: Dilemmas and Options in Transforming War Economies. 2005. Handbook Dialogue Series No. 3 - intro. PDF >
  • Karen Ballentine & Heiko Nitzschke: The Political Ecnomoy of Civil War and Conflict Transformation. 2005. Handbook Dialogue Series No. 3 - lead article. PDF >
  • Olu Arowobusoye: Why They Fight: An Alternative View on the Political Economy of Civil War and Conflict Transformation. 2005. Handbook Dialogue Series No. 3 - comment. PDF >
  • Peter Lock: War Economies and the Shadow of Globalisation. 2005. Handbook Dialogue Series No. 3 - comment. PDF >
  • Nicola Palmer: Defining a Different War Economy: The Case of Sri Lanka. 2005. Handbook Dialogue Series No. 3 - comment. PDF >
  • Volker Boege & Angelika Spelten: The Challenge of War Economies: The Role of the International Community and Civil Society Organisations. 2005. Handbook Dialogue Series No. 3 - comment. PDF >
  • Karen Ballentine & Heiko Nitzschke: Reply to our Discussants. 2005. Handbook Dialogue Series No. 3 - final reflection. PDF >